sounds of '71

music recorded, released and on the charts in 1971, classic rock's classic year ...and related stuff ...and unrelated stuff

hot-in-the-shade:

Led Zeppelin (Liverpool, 1971)

12 hours ago on October 20th | J | 206 notes
Not many things happier than Happy Janis

Not many things happier than Happy Janis

13 hours ago on October 20th | J | 292 notes

The Who 2-fer, San Francisco: 1967 and 1971, by Jim Marshall

17 hours ago on October 20th | J | 49 notes
Black Sabbath, Circus Magazine, August 1971. They couldn’t possibly be more adorable.

Black Sabbath, Circus Magazine, August 1971. They couldn’t possibly be more adorable.

19 hours ago on October 20th | J | 1,790 notes
nine4eight:

Keith Moon in the studio at the Record Plant, New York, 1971.

March 1971, for Who’s Next (although these sessions were not used for the final release)

nine4eight:

Keith Moon in the studio at the Record Plant, New York, 1971.

March 1971, for Who’s Next (although these sessions were not used for the final release)

20 hours ago on October 20th | J | 139 notes
21 hours ago on October 20th | J | 113 notes
slickgrace:

Speechless

slickgrace:

Speechless

1 day ago on October 20th | J | 26 notes
1 day ago on October 20th | J | 906 notes

Greg Lake, of Emerson Lake & Palmer, whose US debut album was released in January, 1971.

1 day ago on October 20th | J | 128 notes
1 day ago on October 20th | J | 687 notes
the-ghost-darkness:

the ghost and the darkness

the-ghost-darkness:

the ghost and the darkness

1 day ago on October 19th | J | 3 notes
Diamond Dog Dave, rocking the vintage Emmanuelle Khanh shades

Diamond Dog Dave, rocking the vintage Emmanuelle Khanh shades

1 day ago on October 19th | J | 154 notes
Jimi Hendrix, by Andrew Maclear

Jimi Hendrix, by Andrew Maclear

1 day ago on October 19th | J | 571 notes
My friend introduced me to Pink Floyd and he showed me a crazy song that lasted like 10 minuets and it was called secrets or something and he said it was about a battle is that true?

Anonymous

That would be the title track to the album A Saucerful of Secrets. There aren’t any actual words, but Roger Waters said in interviews that the sections of the song do indeed reflect a battle. War was an understandably recurring theme for him, as he lost his father in World War II.

The studio version is great, but the live versions were often spectacular: sometimes half an hour long, and often sounding very little like the original. The version recorded in October 1971 for Live At Pompeii is one of the very, very best. Here’s a YouTube link for ya.

Note: you’ve seen a TON of pictures and GIFs from Live At Pompeii on tumblr, and I think more are from “Saucerful of Secrets” than any other song. (“Echoes” is a close second.) Things like Roger Waters banging the shit out of a gong (several different gifs of that one, because he does it several times during the song), David Gilmour sitting barefoot in the dirt, and many more. 

image

image

In fact, this nifty little GIF below has pictures of all four bandmembers during “A Saucerful of Secrets.”

image

Also note: the song is in sections, and the middle two, called “Syncopated Pandemonium” and “Storm Signal,” can be harsh. No doubt about it. That’s often what early Pink Floyd was all about. All Floyd is good Floyd, but personally, I think they got much better later.

Even later in this very song. The final section, “Celestial Voices” — the angels singing after the battle has passed — is the first dot in a straight line that passes through “Atom Heart Mother” and 1971’s “Echoes” on the way to Dark Side of the Moon, which Pink Floyd started recording in December 1971.

So if you start getting annoyed by the racket in the first part of that “Saucerful” YouTube clip above, skip to just past halfway through, and prepare to be transported.

In fact, “Celestial Voices” has taken on a life of its own over the years. There are a bunch of clips of just that section by itself. The Pompeii version is very elegant, but I’ve got a 1970 version from Holland that’s a trip. A mess for sure — David’s voice is shot, the whole thing is out of focus, etc. — but it absolutely rocks. Sometimes a little chaos is good for ya. Take a look.

Thanks for asking! If you’re just now getting into Pink Floyd, welcome to your new lifetime obsession! LOL And of course, allow me to suggest 1971’s Meddle on your way to Dark Side of the Moon as your next stops. :-)

1 day ago on October 19th | J | 57 notes

Robert Plant photographed by Wolfgang Heilemann, 1971.

1 day ago on October 19th | J | 1,709 notes